[image description: A digital poster for detailing the upcoming show. The background image is a dramatically lit image with the light source coming from the window. The image depicts a sheer blue/grey fabric drapped in a room in a canopy style. In the middle is a person with long black hair laying down on a bed with some pillows around them. There is a blue plastic chair in the left hand corner beside a wooden dresser. Over top is a translucent white rectangle with text in the middle "TRANSGENERATIONAL VULNERABILITIES: ALONE, TOGETHER, THEY WILL UNVEIL". The bottom right hand corner of the image reads LUCILLE KIM. Below this whole image is a black bottom portion with the details of the show reading "opening reception & artist talk: may 13 @ 7 pm, running from may 13 to june 4. Khyber Centre for the Arts, 1880 Hollis Street". At the very bottom is funder and presenter logos "HALIFAX regional municipality, ArtsNS, Canada Council for the Arts, Eyelevel, Khyber" ]

[image description: a large black border surrounds a dramatically lit image with the light source coming from the window. The image depicts a sheer blue/grey fabric drapped in a room in a canopy style. In the middle is a person with long black hair laying down on a bed with some pillows around them. There is a blue plastic chair in the left hand corner beside a wooden dresser]

[image description: a large black border surrounds a black and white image. The image is a diptych. On the left hand side is an arm coming from the upper right hand moving a tile with 3 other tiles surrounding them. Each tile has Khmer words carved into them. On the right hand side is a hand coming from the middle left side moving one tile.]

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Transgenerational Vulnerabilities: Alone, Together, They Will Unveil

13 May – 4 Jun 2022

Eyelevel, in partnership with the Khyber Centre for the Arts, is excited to announce Lucille Kim's solo exhibition Transgenerational Vulnerabilities: Alone, Together, They Will  Unveil

This beautiful mixed media installation will be on view from May 13 to June 4 at the Khyber (1880 Hollis Street) with an opening reception and artist talk on Friday, May 13th from 7-9 PM.

LOCATION: The Khyber Centre for the Arts (1880 Hollist Street) link to access notes here

HOURS: 12-5 PM Tuesday to Saturday

ARTIST BIO

Lucille Kim, born in 1992, is a Cambodian-Canadian artist based in Hamilton. She received an HBA in Art & Art History at the University of Toronto specializing in drawing and photography. Objects, architecture, environment, and language challenge notions of personal, familial, and national identities. At the same time, past-present states and subtle narratives emerging from memory bring forth a history about war and its effect upon the human body. Kim’s works have been exhibited at XSpace Cultural Centre, Factory Media Centre, Ace Art Inc, and NAISA.

https://www.lucillekim.com/  | @lucillekim.art | contact@lucillekim.com

EXHIBITION STATEMENT

In this exhibition titled, Transgenerational Vulnerabilities: Alone, Together, They Will  Unveil, spaces of connection and disconnection are in motion when dealing with pain and healing. There is a silent disconnect between my parents and I, born in different countries. Spoken language and personal perspectives tend to cause barriers. We become distant and feel alone in our own pain. But as I inherit certain qualities and genetic factors from my mother and father, we end up finding a way toward similar body language and vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities involve sound, touch, and emotional stressors from history, memory, and the present world around us. 

In the video works entitled 1973-1979, Asleep in Sleeplessness II, and 1980, the use of coin therapy and relief patches provide temporal healing experiences while the constant repetition ignites the strenuous and longevity of pain as permanent. Body movements like my hand in Opposites and the Same along with sounds such as Waves of Fortitude enforce acts of patience to further explore the dualities of pain and healing.  It is the push and pull, the give and take the fluidity and hesitation, and the clarity and obscurity that eventually map parts of our identities. 

While I continue to help my parents escape their pain or simply survive, I realized transgenerational trauma can take effect unexpectedly even after recognizing those similar susceptibilities. Such pain can be reformed into something else and, over the years, overshadowed by the healing methods we implement or by our constant silence.

Eyelevel gratefully acknowledges the support for this project directly and through our operating funds from Arts Nova Scotia, Canada Council for the Arts, and Halifax Regional Municipality